East German Cold Weather Camo Jacket

East German Army SurplusSKU: JKT1174-44-K
4 reviews
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Chest Size:
Price:
Sale price$93.50
or 4 interest-free payments of $23.37  with afterpay
or 6 interest-free payments of $15.58   Laybuy  What's this?
Stock:
Only 1 unit left

Description

*Note* The majority of these jackets are like the first photo, however some differ with the cuffs and are missing the chest pockets (see last photo for reference). These will be picked at random.

Snug in strichtarn, these jackets are what East German soldiers were issued for winter. With a smooth polyester lining and padded polyamide layer inside, these will keep you warm. The cuffs are elasticated so they can trap any body heat generated. An extra add on feature is the collar - these have internal buttons so you can attach a big fur collar much like their Soviet overlords style (fur collar not included). The outside is made from a rugged cotton exterior and complete in the iconic strichtarn/strichmuster camouflage. 

A must for any DDR collectors and also a pretty practical bit of clothing to help keep you warm through winter. Grab one of these jackets today before they go extinct!   

Features:

  • Genuine East German surplus
  • Warm, smooth inner lining (non-removable)
  • 2 x Shoulder pockets (buttoned)
  • Stretchy cuffs for trapping body heat
  • Internal collar buttons for attaching fur collar (not included)
  • Button up front with storm flap

 

Sizing: To find your jacket size, measure the circumference of your chest just under the armpits, the 'Short' or 'Regular' refers to estimated height.  For more information on jacket sizes, check out our sizing guide.

Height: 
Extra short: 158-163cm / 5'2''-5'4''
Short: 164-169cm / 5'4''-5'6''
Regular: 170-175cm / 5'7''-5'9''
Long: 176-181cm / 5'9''-5'11''
Extra Long: 182-187cm / 5'11''-6'1''
Extra extra long: 188-193cm / 6'2''-6'4''

Weight: Approx 1.5kg
Content: Cotton blend outer / polyester lining / polyamide inner lining
Colour: Rain Camouflage Pattern (Strichtarn)
Condition: Used/Good - Item is well used. There may be marks/stains/scratches or repairs, but it is still in functioning order. If you want more information on our condition ratings, check out our condition guide

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Customer Reviews

Based on 4 reviews
100%
(4)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
E
Elijah
Strichtarn!!!!

This winterwear is in amazing condition! Strichtarn is definitely my favourite camouflage pattern of all time, and I reckon I'll just leave a bit of an infodump here :) - - -
Strichtarn traces its roots as far back as the German interwar period when Splittermuster 31 was released for mass production on Zeltbahn shelter halves. This pattern used hard geometric shapes which had an overlay of a raindrop pattern on top of the entire camouflage (sound familiar?). The rain pattern was hoped to increase the disruption of the pattern to a silhouette when viewed at close range. - - -

After the second world war, as many of us know, Germany had been divided in two. After both countries got their act together and started creating uniforms, which weren't just m40 tunics with all the insignia cut off, the West decided an olive drab would be an adequate, cheap solution. East Germany however felt large scale issue of camouflage would be their best option had the Cold War gone hot. Thus Blumentarn '58 (Which deceptively was first issued in 1956, when the NVA was first formed) was issued to troops. This Blumentarn consisted of large jagged 'splotches' of ochre, dark, and light green covered a tan field. It was massively issued and took forms of just about any canvas or fabric equipment you could think of. - - -

Part way through the next decade, the Soviet overlords felt that this pattern resembled the current USSR patterns to closely, which could cause issues with troop organisation. (The Blumentarn does quite strongly resemble Russian patterns of the time, in particular the "solnechnye zaychiki"). It was decided that the DDR must develop a new camouflage which would differ from their Warsaw Pact comrades. This would become the beloved Strictarn. - - -

The Strichtarn harked back to distinctly German designs (although the Polish had already thought of it a few years previously) from the Second World War, like the previously mentioned Splittermuster. The design was made to match the long spindles of coniferous trees in the German woods, and did so with moderate success (Many do speculate the camouflage was only as effective as its base green, I'll let you form your own opinions on this.). Just like the Blumentarn before, this pattern got pasted onto almost every piece of fabric the German military put into the field. It would go onto become synonymous with the Cold War and Berlin wall.
The camouflage would remain nearly entirely the same for the next nearly 30 years which the DDR existed for, except for minor design tweaks to the pattern when raindrops were made thicker and the entire pattern was darkened in 1968, only 3 years after the initial adoption of the camouflage. The jacket being sold here is the more common post 1968 pattern, which I gotta say, I do prefer. - - -

Well, I think that is just about enough Strichtarn for one review, and I just want to say, I picked ip one of these jackets myself and the quality is exceptional! Got a very nice condition jacket, with fabric that was not noticeably faded in the slightest. It is warm and a great addition to my DDR collection. I would recommend it to anybody interested in Cold War militaria, or even just a nice jacket. - - -

Hope something could be learned from my comment, and I hope anyone reading this ahs a lovely day!

C
Customer
Warm and valuable

I am a collector of Soviet surplus, particularly East German Army. I have a copy of this jacket and i must say it is quite warm. It's a perfect gift for wearing out in the bitter cold of the Mount Hood region here in Oregon. Can't miss a deal as great as this

P
Phillip Mitchell

One of the nicest fitting bits of military surplus I own. Super warm. Great condition. Even had a 750 years of Berlin anniversary candy wrapper in the pocket

A
Andrew Barron
Great Cold War, Cold Weather purchase

My jacket was unused from 1982,in perfect condition and exactly what I was looking for.
Uncommon items in the Southern Hemisphere for collectors, really well insulated and light for actual use.
The matching pants are also super warm and can be easily modified by adding belt loops to avoid using suspenders.
The best quality Eastern bloc winter clothing around.
The only possible improvement is if the fur collars become available.
Don't pass up on a chance to get some of these Cold War,Cold Weather gems.

Customer Reviews

Based on 4 reviews
100%
(4)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
E
Elijah
Strichtarn!!!!

This winterwear is in amazing condition! Strichtarn is definitely my favourite camouflage pattern of all time, and I reckon I'll just leave a bit of an infodump here :) - - -
Strichtarn traces its roots as far back as the German interwar period when Splittermuster 31 was released for mass production on Zeltbahn shelter halves. This pattern used hard geometric shapes which had an overlay of a raindrop pattern on top of the entire camouflage (sound familiar?). The rain pattern was hoped to increase the disruption of the pattern to a silhouette when viewed at close range. - - -

After the second world war, as many of us know, Germany had been divided in two. After both countries got their act together and started creating uniforms, which weren't just m40 tunics with all the insignia cut off, the West decided an olive drab would be an adequate, cheap solution. East Germany however felt large scale issue of camouflage would be their best option had the Cold War gone hot. Thus Blumentarn '58 (Which deceptively was first issued in 1956, when the NVA was first formed) was issued to troops. This Blumentarn consisted of large jagged 'splotches' of ochre, dark, and light green covered a tan field. It was massively issued and took forms of just about any canvas or fabric equipment you could think of. - - -

Part way through the next decade, the Soviet overlords felt that this pattern resembled the current USSR patterns to closely, which could cause issues with troop organisation. (The Blumentarn does quite strongly resemble Russian patterns of the time, in particular the "solnechnye zaychiki"). It was decided that the DDR must develop a new camouflage which would differ from their Warsaw Pact comrades. This would become the beloved Strictarn. - - -

The Strichtarn harked back to distinctly German designs (although the Polish had already thought of it a few years previously) from the Second World War, like the previously mentioned Splittermuster. The design was made to match the long spindles of coniferous trees in the German woods, and did so with moderate success (Many do speculate the camouflage was only as effective as its base green, I'll let you form your own opinions on this.). Just like the Blumentarn before, this pattern got pasted onto almost every piece of fabric the German military put into the field. It would go onto become synonymous with the Cold War and Berlin wall.
The camouflage would remain nearly entirely the same for the next nearly 30 years which the DDR existed for, except for minor design tweaks to the pattern when raindrops were made thicker and the entire pattern was darkened in 1968, only 3 years after the initial adoption of the camouflage. The jacket being sold here is the more common post 1968 pattern, which I gotta say, I do prefer. - - -

Well, I think that is just about enough Strichtarn for one review, and I just want to say, I picked ip one of these jackets myself and the quality is exceptional! Got a very nice condition jacket, with fabric that was not noticeably faded in the slightest. It is warm and a great addition to my DDR collection. I would recommend it to anybody interested in Cold War militaria, or even just a nice jacket. - - -

Hope something could be learned from my comment, and I hope anyone reading this ahs a lovely day!

C
Customer
Warm and valuable

I am a collector of Soviet surplus, particularly East German Army. I have a copy of this jacket and i must say it is quite warm. It's a perfect gift for wearing out in the bitter cold of the Mount Hood region here in Oregon. Can't miss a deal as great as this

P
Phillip Mitchell

One of the nicest fitting bits of military surplus I own. Super warm. Great condition. Even had a 750 years of Berlin anniversary candy wrapper in the pocket

A
Andrew Barron
Great Cold War, Cold Weather purchase

My jacket was unused from 1982,in perfect condition and exactly what I was looking for.
Uncommon items in the Southern Hemisphere for collectors, really well insulated and light for actual use.
The matching pants are also super warm and can be easily modified by adding belt loops to avoid using suspenders.
The best quality Eastern bloc winter clothing around.
The only possible improvement is if the fur collars become available.
Don't pass up on a chance to get some of these Cold War,Cold Weather gems.

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